Types of childcarer roles

It is often confusing to know the difference between the various childcarer roles on offer so we hope our guide will help you assess the different types of roles available and help you choose which is right for you.




Daily Nanny


As a guide, full time Daily nannies usually work approx 10 hours a day, 5 days a week. Care of the children is usually on a sole-charge basis. Depending on the individual role, one evening a week babysitting would be included in the salary. In other instances, if babysitting were required this would be agreed in advance and paid extra.

Responsibilities of a Live-out nanny will vary enormously from family to family but would typically include duties such as playing, educating, outdoor play, taking children to activities, as well as doing the children’s’ washing and ironing, clearing toys away, keeping the nursery tidy, cooking and reporting back to the parents.

Daily nannies can also be part-time and this option is becoming increasingly popular with families. A part-time nanny could either be morning or afternoons only, or 2 or 3 full days per week. The duties would be the same as a full time nanny.

 

Live-in Nanny


As a guide, Live-in nannies normally work approx 11-12 hours a day, 5 days a week, with 1-2 evening babysitting included. They will usually have sole-charge of the children, however some shared care may also be required when one or both of the parents are at home.

As with Daily nannies, responsibilities of a Live-in nanny will vary enormously from family to family but would typically include duties such as playing, educating, outdoor play, taking children to activities, as well as doing the children’s’ washing and ironing, clearing toys away, keeping the nursery tidy, cooking and reporting back to the parents.

 

Mother’s help


Mother’s Help positions are usually suitable for younger, inexperienced and/or recently qualified candidates, looking to enhance their experience before moving on to become a Nanny.

The key difference between a Mother’s Help and a Nanny is that you will not yet have sufficient experience to be given constant sole-charge of the children. You would usually work alongside the parent as an extra pair of hands. Whilst the duties will vary from family to family, you may find that you may be required to perform light household duties e.g. shopping, driving etc and these would be agreed with you in advance. The role will develop into a more responsible one the longer you stay with the family and the more initiative you show in your supporting role.

 

Maternity Nurse


A Maternity nurse is normally employed 24-hours, five to seven days per week, for a period of 1-12 weeks following the birth of a baby.

Maternity nurses assist the mother in putting the baby into a sleep routine and if necessary will assist in establishing a good nursing programme. They may bottle feed a baby if this is required by the family. They offer invaluable advice and support to new parents in how to best care for their new baby.

Maternity nurses may also care for older children in the home also allowing the mother more time to spend with the newest addition to the family.

Most Maternity Nurses will come from a nanny or midwifery background, so will have had a long career working with babies and children. We would expect a Maternity Nurse to have taken advantage of the many additonal courses available offering specialist training for Maternity Nurses. These cover sleep training, breast and bottle feeding, weaning, baby & mum health care, multiples and the Maternity Nurse Training Course (MNT).